Chemical Poisoning

Despite taking precautions like labeling poisonous chemicals and keeping them out of the sight and reach of children, chemical poisoning emergencies do arise. Let us prepare ourselves for the quick and decisive action that is called for.

Domestic chemical poisons can be divided into three categories: 1. Corrosives like acids and alkalis. 2. Petroleum products. 3. Pesticides.

There are three ways that poisonous chemicals can get into the human system and wreak their havoc. They may be taken in

through the mouth (ingested)
through the nose (inhaled) or
through the skin (absorbed)

Depending on the concentration dosage and duration of exposure, these poisons (especially corrosives) do the most harm when they are ingested as they impair the mouth, foodpipe (esophagus) and stomach and, if aspirated, even the lungs, thus impairing breathing.

But whatever the chemical, and whether it is ingested or inhaled, if the person is semi-conscious, unconscious or convulsing, do not give any fluids or try to induce vomiting. If he is semi-conscious or unconscious, make him lie on his side so that the fluid drains out and stay by his side. Contact an ambulance service or try to get him to a hospital a soon as possible.

If the person is conscious, look for specific symptoms of chemical poisoning like burn marks or swelling around the mouth, increased salivation, constricted pupils, a pungent smell or spray paint on the face and hands. (Many non-specific symptoms like vomiting, mental confusion, breathlessness, convulsions and even coma may be mistaken for other acute illnesses.)

Though, in most cases, antidotes are indicated by the manufacturer on the packaging of domestic products that can cause poisoning, they are not always accurate or adequate. Nevertheless, locating the container helps in ascertaining the nature of the poisonous chemical so that suitable first aid measures can be taken.

The specific measures depend upon the category in which the chemical falls:

CORROSIVES

ACIDS

Some acids in common domestic use are: hydrochloric acid, bleach (sodium hypochlorite and oxalic acid), toilet bowl cleaner (sulphuric acid), and phenyl (carbolic acid).

Symptoms of acid poisoning: Scalding, and hence a burning pain around the lips and the mouth, palate, the tongue and, most probably, the hands. Acids act on clothes by completely eating them away, giving the impression that holes have been cut out. The person may also cough and get breathless.

How to treat:

DON’T

Induce vomiting by pressing a finger down the throat or making the person drink saline water: the convulsive movements of vomiting put a strain on the walls of the stomach and may perforate it. If the stomach gets perforated and the acid leaks into the peritoneal (abdominal) cavity, it could prove fatal. Besides, if vomiting is induced, on its return journey up the esophageal tract, the acid will compound the damage.
Give an alkali (like soda bicarb) in the hope of neutralizing the acid. The equally corrosive alkali will aggravate the damage done by the acid. Besides, the chemical reaction that takes place between the two will release carbon dioxide which will bloat the stomach and increase the chances of peroration.

WHAT TO DO:

If the person appears to have difficulty breathing or if he has stopped breathing, give mouth-to-mouth respiration. This is done by positioning the person flat on his back on a hard surface. Kneeling at his side, place one hand under his neck and the other on his forehead and gently tilt his head back so the chin points up. Pinch the nose shut and give four quick breaths at the rate of twelve times a minute or once every five seconds for an adult; and twenty times per minute or once every three seconds for a small child or infant.

If the person begins to vomit, turn his head to one side to allow the vomitus to drain out so that it does not enter the airway.

If the person is convulsing, keep calm and place a padded object such as handkerchief between his teeth to prevent him from biting his tongue or cheek. Don not force his jaw open if he has already clamped it shut. Loosen tight clothing. Once the convulsive movements stop, turn him on his side to allow his tongue to fall forward and excess saliva to drain out of his mouth.

If the person is in shock, the symptoms will include: shallow breathing, weak pulse, nausea and vomiting, shivering, pale, moist skin, dropping eyelids, dilated pupils, mental confusion and even collapse. Keep the victim lying down and elevate his feet by about 12 inches. Maintain normal body temperature. Give nothing by mouth.

If the person is conscious and is not convulsing, quickly give about three tablespoons of vegetable oil, or milk cream, or melted butter or the white of an egg. They partly neutralize the acid and form a protective coating along the lining of the mouth, pharynx, esophagus and stomach to prevent further damage.

If the acid has entered the eyes and the person wears contact lenses, remove the lenses first and flush with plenty of water. If only one eye is contaminated, turn the head so that the injured side is down and flood the inner corner with cool water for at least five minutes. Or, hold the eye under a stream of cold water from a tap, making sure the acid does not wash into the other eye. Cover with clean gauze but not with absorbent cotton (the fibres can get lodged in the eye.)

Similarly, wash off any acid from the skin with plenty of water preferably under a tap or shower.

Remove contaminated clothing. Rush the person to the hospital to minimize late complications like narrowing of the esophagus which involves long-term surgical measures for correction.

Alkalis

In the domestic setting, these may be found in drain cleaners (sodium hydroxide), button batteries (sodium and potassium hydroxide), and products containing ammonia.

Symptoms: Since alkalis are also corrosive, the symptoms will be the same as in the case of acids, only the membranes of the mouth appear white and swollen, instead of scalded.

How to treat:

The action to be taken is also similar, only don’t five an acid in the hope of neutralizing the alkali as its corrosive action will worsen the damage.

Button batteries if swallowed are removable with a gastroscope (inserted into the stomach through the mouth) or through surgery.

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS

These include gasoline, kerosene, benzene, lighter fluid, furniture polish and paraffin.

Symptoms: Burning irritation in the throat, coughing, breathlessness and possibly shock.

DON’T

Induce vomiting as the poison could enter the lungs via the windpipe on its way up and induce chemical pneumonia.
Give water. Petroleum products, because of their low density, float on water, which increases the chances of their entering the lungs and causing chemical pneumonia.

How to treat:

If he has difficulty breathing or has stopped breathing, give mouth-to-mouth respiration.

Treat for shock, if necessary.

Only the absence of the symptoms listed above (an indication that a small quantity has been ingested) should the person be inducted to vomit.

As there is no specific antidote, it’s important to take the person to a hospital as soon as possible.

PESTICIDES

These fall into two categories:

Organophosphorus compounds. All cockroach and bug repellents come in this category.
This category includes DDT (an organochlorine insecticide), moth repellent, also called naphthalene balls (hydrocarbons), and rodenticides or rat poison (phosphide).

Symptoms: A strong, pungent smell pre-dominates.

Since the chemical stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, it brings on a constriction of the pupils and increased salivation. It may also bring on nausea, vomiting, breathlessness, drowsiness, sweating, convulsions and even coma.

How to treat:

If the person has difficulty breathing, give mouth-to-mouth respiration.

Induce vomiting by giving two glasses of water with at least two teaspoonful of common salt stirred into each glass. If the person does not vomit, give more of this solution until he vomits and the vomitus stops smelling of the poison. Children who cannot easily be induced to drink such a solution should be forced to vomit by pressing a finger down their throat.

Collect the vomitus and take it, along with the container of the product, to the hospital.

Do not delay transporting the victim. As the chemical stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, it brings on increased motility (movements) of the gastrointestinal tract, and if the poison travels from the stomach to the small bowel it will cause further damage.

WHEN POISONS ARE INHALED:

Chemical poisoning can be caused by inhaling gases such as carbon monoxide, volatile liquids like gasoline, turpentine and paints, or the fumes from acids or from pesticides such as cockroach and mosquito repellents or DDT.

Carbon monoxide collects due to incomplete combustion of gasoline in a car, particularly when it is left in a closed garage with its motor running; or when heating equipment, including gas ranges, are used in poorly-ventilated rooms.

Signs and Symptoms: Coughing

Rapid or slow pulse

Irritation or burning of the eyes

A burning sensation in the mouth, nose, throat and chest

A burning or itching in the underarms, groin and other moist areas of the body

Severe headache

Nausea and vomiting

Another helpful indication is the presence of spray paint or other substances on the person’s face.

However, it is important to realize that carbon monoxide, being odourless and tasteless, will give rise to practically no symptoms except headache. It may, however, cause the lips and cheeks of a fair-skinned victim to turn red.

How to treat:

Take a gulp of fresh air before entering a dangerously-polluted room.

Get the person away from the contaminated air and into fresh, clean air.

If the person is not breathing, begin mouth-to-mouth respiration promptly.

If he is conscious and breathing, ask him to take deep, slow breaths.

Loosen his clothing, using minimal contact, so as to avoid getting skin burns.

Get the person to a hospital a soon as possible.

WHEN POISONS ARE ABSORBED:

Poisonous chemicals which fall in this category include organophosphorus compounds (cockroach and bug repellents), fungicides, rodent poison, wood preservatives, paints, varnishes, paint thinners, waxes and polishes, motor oil and de-greasers and aerosols (spray insecticides). Absorbed poisons usually irritate or damage the skin. However, if they are highly concentrated and absorbed in large amounts, they can enter the blood-stream via the blood vessels under the skin and bring on the same symptoms as if the poisons were ingested.

Symptoms: Skin reactions from mild irritation to burns.

Itching

Irritation of the eyes

Headache

How to treat:

Carefully brush off any dry chemicals from the skin.

Wash the areas exposed to the poison with plenty of water. Remove all contaminated clothing, shoes and accessories, including jewellery, wrist watch, etc.

Then, once again wash the affected areas with soap and water.

Transport the person to a hospital.

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The Many Benefits Of Good Posture

Having good posture is an important part of remaining healthy. IT helps you avoid back pain and premature wear on your bones, improves lung performance, and much more. In this article, we will explain what good posture is before explaining the many benefits that it provides.

What is good posture?

Posture is the form that your body takes when you are sitting, standing, and laying down. Maintaining “good” posture is positioning your body so there is less strain placed upon your body’s muscles and ligaments when in these positions.

It requires your body to be as close to its natural shape as possible. So if you are sitting down, this would mean:

Keeping your chin up and looking forward
Keeping your shoulders back (not slouching)
Bending your knees at a right angle
Keeping your feet flat on the floor
Keeping your back straight enough that all 3 natural curves of the spine are present.

Sitting with good posture distributes weight more evenly across your muscle groups – helping you avoid neck, shoulder and back pain. It also allows you to comfortably work for longer periods and avoid some serious long-term health problems.

Having a chair with lumbar support will help you maintain good back posture.

What are the benefits of good posture?

Protects your future health

Having good posture will keep your joints correctly aligned, protecting the joint surfaces from abnormal wear-and-tear. By preventing this type of wear-and-tear, you can lower your risk of various illnesses including arthritis and postural hunchback.

It makes it easier to breathe

The diaphragm is a large muscle that is responsible for respiration. When the diaphragm moves, it changes how much pressure there is within the thorax – causing air to either enter or exit the lungs.

Posture affects breathing because it changes how much room the diaphragm has to move. If you are slouched in a chair or while walking, the diaphragm cannot contract or expand as easily, preventing you from taking deep breaths. As soon as you correct your posture, you will immediately notice how much easier it is to breathe. This is a particularly useful benefit for anyone who has a health condition that affects their breathing.

Can help prevent back pain

Developing good posture can eliminate back pain caused by stressed muscles and poor joint alignment. It does so by actively reducing the strain placed on the muscles and joints by spreading weight across the entire body. This ensures that certain muscles or joints are not overworked or damaged.

Over time, having good posture will even improve the alignment of your spine, which will improve the condition of your back and reduce the risk of back injuries. You will be less likely to suffer from herniated discs, muscle strains or other back problems.

Improved physical performance

Good posture requires the use of more muscle groups. Not only does this reduce the chances of straining a single muscle, it can lead to an improvement in overall physical performance. Having the ability to engage muscles more evenly will help you perform better during daily activities and any sports that you play.

Strengthens the core

If you have already made improvements to your sitting posture, you will have noticed that your abdominal muscles feel more engaged. Your abdominals will be “sharing the load” with your back muscles as they keep your torso stable. The more you improve your posture, the stronger your core will get, thus improving the alignment of your spine, reducing stress on your back muscles, and improving your mobility.

Makes you look more attractive

Have you ever seen an actor or actress on a talk show? Did you notice how impeccable his or her posture was? Actors and actresses concentrate on having good posture because they understand how much it affects their appearance. By sitting tall in their seat and keeping their chin up, they will look much more beautiful or handsome to the viewers at home. You will gain the same benefits as you improve your posture.

Improved digestion of food

Sitting or standing with good posture will ensure your internal organs are in their natural position. This makes it easier for the body to digest food and perform other important functions like maintaining good blood circulation.

Can improve your mood

Researchers from the University of San Francisco have discovered that having good posture can help improve a person’s mood. They found that improved posture could also increase energy levels and reduce the risk of mental illnesses like depression.

Improving your posture can deliver some amazing benefits to your health and lifestyle. If you are interested in developing good posture, talk to a chiropractor or general practitioner. You can also use online resources like NHS choices to learn more.

Simple Ways To Prevent Your Liver From Wrecking

The liver is a large meaty organ that sits in the abdomen of vertebrates. Its primary function includes the excretion of hormones and drugs, enzyme activation, metabolism of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates and much more. To keep it healthy is a key to live a disease free life. As a liver disease can be as far as worse that call for the transplant and damage other organs as well. However, there are some easy ways you can opt to prevent the condition. So, what are we waiting for? It’s always better safe than sorry, so, let’s dig into these preventive tips that you should keep in mind to prevent any wreck to your liver.

· Watch Your Alcohol Intake: The liver is an important body organ that performs vital functions and alcohol has the power to damage some of its cells after the filtration of the alcohol every time. Therefore, you should say “No” to it, or at least you can limit its quantity to prevent a number of liver diseases.

· Say Yes To More And More Glasses Of Water: Water is important to keep the liver healthy and ensure its smooth functioning. It’ll help to flush the bad toxins out of your body and filter it properly, which ensure its good health. Thus, you should have water on a regular basis in an adequate quantity, as per your body type. It’ll not only prevent a number of liver diseases, but also keeps you healthy.

· Get Moving: If you are the one whose miles away from the exercise, so, it’s high time to incorporate it into your lifestyle. You should do some sort of exercise on a regular basis to keep your body moving. It is not only good for your muscles or bones, but also keeps your liver healthy and away from a number of diseases or infections.

· Have A Balanced Diet: It is always good to watch out what you are having, as it plays a vital role in making or breaking the health of your liver. You should moderate your diet accordingly to ensure that all you are having doesn’t leave any wrong impact on your liver or overall body.

These are a few good habits you can and you should incorporate into your daily routine, to ensure that the liver or any other disease stays miles away from you. It is always good to be careful about your health, as it is the key to live a happy life.

Unintegrated Primitive Reflexes May Be Hindering Your Life

I came across the subject of Primitive Reflexes a few times in the last year, and really took an interest about a month ago when I decided to do a course online about it.

Doing anything in my body has always been hard for me, and learning about the unintegrated reflexes made me realise why.

It so happened that the only person trained in NZ on the Rhythmic Movement website, lives 8 mins away from me I’ve had one session so far with her, she’s a kineseologist, and she worked getting my body switched on to achieve success integrating the reflexes.

These reflexes can be integrated at any age in life.

It appears from all my symptoms and the journey in my life, I have an active fear paralysis reflex and actiive moro reflex. It all makes so much sense now. Just even reading the course has me in tears because I relate to it all so much.

Reflexes

A reflex is an automatic, repetitive movement that is instinctual and aids in development, as well as development of the brain. We have many reflexes, like blinking, but the one’s I want to talk about are primitive reflexes. These are reflexes that are formed in the womb and hopefully become inactive in the toddler stage.

Sucking, and grasping of the hands, are primitive reflexes. These reflexes, and others, are designed to transform into more sophisticated movements, and therefore become integrated. They form the foundation, and development of balance, mobility, hearing, speaking, vision, learning and communicating.

Unintegrated Reflexes

There are many reasons why these reflexes don’t phase out, ie: lack of movement as a child, stress in the mother in pregnancy, illness, environmental toxins and many more reasons. They can be retriggered any time in life, often due to trauma and stress, and because of this, can cause a whole host of issues ranging from anxiety, ADHD, depression, learning disorders, sensory disorders, lack of confidence, extreme shyness, vision and hearing problems, addictions, autism and constantly feeling overwhelmed.

Reflex movements are the foundation of our nervous system, they originate in the brain stem, so they really are about survival, and staying unintegrated cause someone to be constantly in fight or flight. Body parts can’t move independently and freely, and can cause weak muscle tone, aches and muscle tension, fatigue, and a lot of effort to complete tasks.

Key Childhood Reflexes

Fear Paralysis Reflex

This reflex should ideally be integrated before birth and is about freezing, as in a deer in the headlights. Without integration it may cause the Moro reflex to not integrate as well.

Some long term effects of an unintegrated Fear Paralysis reflex are:

Underlying anxiety
Insecurity
Depression
Extreme shyness
Fear of groups
Fear of separation
Phobias
Withdrawal from touch
Sleep and eating disorders
and many more

Moro Reflex

Sometimes called the infant-startle reflex, this is an automatic reaction to sudden changes in stimuli, ie: bright lights, sounds, temperature, touch, movement. Unintegrated, a person can feel hypersensitive to any incoming stimulation. This can cause a change in blood pressure, cortisol and adrenaline levels, and breathing rate.

Some long term effects of an unintegrated Moro reflex are:

Poor digestion
Weak immune system
Poor balance and coordination
Difficulty adapting to change
Difficulty filtering stimuli
hyperactivity then fatigue
Difficulty with visual perception
Hypersensitivity to sound, light, touch, movement, smell
Emotional outbursts, easy to anger
and many more

Other reflexes that can be unintegrated are Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex, Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex, Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex, Spinal Galant Reflex, Oral, Hand and Foot Reflexes.

Integrating Reflexes

There are different body movements to do daily in order to integrate these reflexes. I’ve read a lot of wonderful testimonials about the changes that can happen. I will keep you updated about what happens for me in my sessions and from doing the course online.